About your Search

20121002
20121010
STATION
CSPAN2 75
LANGUAGE
English 75
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking a
good luck. god bless. [applause] . . the turning point. a change debate. the role of government, free-market, future trajectory of our nation. in that debate to campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bites, the reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the midst of all of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restor
government calls for dialogue at the beginning of the events in my country, but this call did not find any positive response from most opposition parties. moreover, my government responded positively throughout the crisis to each and every sincere initiative that aims to find a peaceful solution, a solution that is based on national dialogue among syrians, that rejects external manipulation, and that stops the shedding of syrian blood and preserving syria and its future. based on this principle position, and despite the syrian leadership's conviction that there are no sincere intentions among some regional and international parties that push for the escalation of the syrian crisis, which fuel its fire and heat it by forcing all attempts for dialogue, and insisting on creating a state of instability to ensure the need for foreign interference. despite all this, syria cooperated with the arab observers mission, and the subsequent international initiatives linked to the work of the united nations special envoy kofi annan. out of principle, syria received the united nations supervision is seen
and usa government doing too much. still the majority of americans, 54% continue to believe the government is trying to do too many things that should be left to individuals and businesses. the high as 61% this summer. four out of ten americans, 39% say the government should do more to solve the nation's problems. we want to turn to you and ask you what do you believe the role of the government should be in your life? let's listen to president obama as he answered that question in the debate this week to inspect the first role of the government is to keep people safe. that is the most basic function, and as commander-in-chief, that is something that i have worked on and thought about every single day that i've been in the oval office. but i also believe that government has the capacity, the federal government has the capacity to help open up opportunities and create ladders of opportunity and create frameworks' where the american people can succeed. the genius of america is the free enterprise system and freedom, and the fact that people can go out there and start a business, work on an id
very strong views about governing and governance. and i don't early on that either side, governor schwarzenegger's has a monopoly on the best ideas. neither side has a monopoly on wisdom or so pricey and they can predict the future. so you start off with that mindset. i've been called for you as a moderate republican and i am just simply if you have a problem coming back to solve it. you don't run just to win. i mean, there's two parts to the equation. he went away many went together. as this in the last couple years we've lost the part of the equation. you run to win, run to win, run to win. what is the point of holding the office if you cat doing something with it? a couple observations that colleagues have made this is not just republicans or democrats. i suspect they ran against you. lindsey graham wasn't conservative enough, a good friend of mine told me a couple weeks ago that when i ran for governor, they thought it was too conservative to be governor of wisconsin. if the guy running for the senate and i don't think i'm conservative enough. even within the party were becomi
a number of years in the spanish government from 1977 to 82. he was an active participant in the negotiations for spanish entry to what is now the european union, the european economic community. he also participated in a number of spanish negotiation then they got, not wto and with the european union and spain a century into the union after democracy was restored in spain and spain was welcomed into the european community process. in the last year at this government coming was minister of the presidency, played a very essential role in the entire spanish government situation. shortly after he joined banco santander and has now been there for over 20 years. he is now vice-chairman of the bank, member of the board, also member of the board of banesto, banco santander in portugal, a member of the board of a number of other financial companies in the group and is president of the print of the foundation and spain. i think we are uniquely privileged data to have a speaker from banco santander with its unique ability to see both the spanish situation, the overall banking situat
to be put in to a situation where you have a government determining somebody who wants to put the idea up on television can't do that. that's one of the things with the campaign finance is that it's what to nay say about democracy is the worst form of government except for the worst form of government. the campaign finance system may not look perfect. when you look at the alternative i don't know they are god either. i don't know if it's a good to have the department of justice to determine he can't run television ads. ic you should be able to do that. i think it's a first amendment right. when you move to the constitutional right it starts getting ugly. >> yeah. we don't -- even or side there's been money in elections for forever. lots of money. going back as long as with can. we can go back to george washington and the night before. there was tails of flying rum and beer and the voice rang out the day 6 election day. how to they got out of the book. there's been money and things in politics for as long as we know. i don't think either side of a necessarily thinks the money itself and ha
it into english and went along the lines of its against the hagues of the government which is you blame every single mistake and work against the state. on the other hand, i mentioned henry david who was pivotal in my thinking. he basically had the idea of not the idea of living but he went out on civil disobedience to the hill and saw this absolute duty that surrounded him. i want to look around myself and say here there is no state. i try to do that every day by making sure i can see everything from interacting with my neighbors in the sense of exchange and privatizing my life, taking my life back from the state and privatizing it to the extent possible do i interject in the state and make sure you go into businesses that are privatizing government services. we are going to an unprecedented period of the state control and i'm not saying that you should marker yourself or your family. that would be reckless. to the extent possible privatize your own personal life. >> does that mean you are living off the grid and not flying on their plans because of tsa and all the different regulations. are
government, that washington seems to think is, um, you know, a good idea and ends up being counterproductive with a state like virginia that is growing, that has all the potential in the world but yet being held back because of its infrastructure shortcomings. so, yes, there's a lot we can do which is less and allow virginia to do more. >> moderator: mr. powell. powell: u.n., eric, you did not -- you know, eric, you did not support the stimulus the president initiated, however -- and, of course, i read so many things, i can't remember where i read it. i believe fredericksburg up to norb -- northern virginia. i may be wrong about that. >> you're wrong about that. >> well, let me finish. i let you finish, let me finish. in any case, you don't like government. you should just, like, resign, and i'll take over. [laughter] needless to say, government does have a role. i met people all over the district who, for example, in orange and culpepper counties, real people, human beings who couldn't get a connectivity for their cell phones, couldn't get their computer to work, couldn't call anybody. peop
't. it doesn't work for them because cartels and powerful entries like government cut down to size. i want to talk to them and all the millions of people across our country who don't think they get a fair crack of the whip. i don't want to say to them, guess our problems are deep, but they can be overcome. these problems about who pritt ms. fuller and who prospers within it. one rule for those at the top, and other rule for everybody else. two nations, not one. i want to say to them today, it is not the britain you believe in. it's not the britain i believe in. it is not the written this party will ever be satisfied with. [applause] friends, we are going to change it, and here's how. we can start with the inner strength of the country. you see, the problem is that the british people. of the paralympic games. it was a trial for britain. [applause] and wanting to succeed, we succeeded because of our outstanding athletes from zara phillips, the granddaughter of a parachuting queen to a boy born in somalia called mo farah. mo farah, a true brit, a true hero to our country. [applause] we succee
've seen so far, indicate about the approach to management and governance. today with a simple and outstanding panel of speakers to help us analyze these questions. jon huntsman is a past presidential candidate, so he has a lot of authenticity to discuss these leadership questions. but if i know anything about the subject matter i wouldn't be here today. [laughter] >> we are still please you are here. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l
done because there is no place to retreat true -- retreat to. our entire government or democracy to be successful has to be more young people getting involved in i'm not saying that just because i'm a young person. through my work on the city council, it brings something to our system. in fact i'm convinced that they bring three things. the first is energy. if you have ever tried to make a change it takes an inordinate amount of energy beyond even what you'd even expected. 14, 15, 16 hour days and things that you thought would take a week. if you don't have the energy to see these things through, young people have more energy than they know what to do with. that is because you didn't go to bed until 5:00 a.m.. at my age if i didn't get to bed until 5:00 a.m. i would not wake up until monday. the second thing is creativity. honest-to-goodness, this is something that -- have you ever seen a 6-year-old playing in out of nowhere they say i'm a dinosaur. they believe that in that moment or go in their mind so radically changes the status quo. they have no attachments to the status quo
of city government. i was chairing an elected commission in los angeles to revise the city charter, and i saw then that he not only was amazingly talented, but a reporter of enormous integrity. at one point he believed the los angeles times was not devoting nearly enough time to charter reform, it was important to the city, and according to los angeles weekly, he quit his position at the los angeles times in protest over this. he put his very job on the line because he believed in the importance of the story. he was then and is now an enormous star of the los angeles times. and as a result of that, the los angeles times decided to change it approach and gave tremendous attention to charter reform. i will always believe that charter reform succeeded in 1999 in los angeles because of what jim newton did and the covers of the l.a. times. a few years ago he mentioned to me he was planning to take some time off to do a biography of earl warren. i thought it was a great idea. and then i had the chance to read the book, and without a doubt it's the best judicial biography that i've ever read. so
hollywood, big government, big journalism, and big peace, p, e, a, c, e. he became a big player what is come to be called the new media including work as editor on "the drudge report" website and yes the "huffington post". bull buckley didn't dwell in the past but he believed we should and could learn from it. he was fascinated by the rise of the new media and encouraged conservatives to become involved in it as he had in the old media. he didn't live to see it come to full fruition and andrew left us too soon for him to become a greater influence than he already has. a tribute to him that his web sites and work endure. it is my pleasure as the winner of last year's william f. buckley, jr., award to present this year's award posthumously to andrew breitbart. may he rest in peace. [applause] may he rest in peace and may his legacy live on. accepting the award is oars son dean, susie's father and with him is alley mills dean. ♪ . >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. you may remember me. i formally went on the screen, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some fr
in implementation and impossible peace negotiations with the government. >> we tried to actually deal with this because behind the pressing issue of the recent violation and that is extremely a significant word in the syrian psyche at the moment, to see how recent and how large and as my colleague and friend here, rafif, was discussing the extent of the discussion. it is an overwhelming reality at the moment. you have those as you mentioned impacted very much throughout the last decade. but the way we try to do with this and the document is a recommended to committees that we passed an historic committee dealing with violations of human rights prior to the revolution and a communication with the recent plantations. of course through a grant to the challenge of documentation, but this is a process that's your intent to go through because really you have not counted or really given since i sent that accountability for all the torture they went through. recently in a workshop in istanbul that rami and iraq, which really gave us a sense of how the syrians are really responding in positive
at the washington post before i escaped the belt way with my florida girl. government is not a new topic for me. i did not think i could have written this book if i still lived in washington. the group think is too strong and it is almost impossible to overstate the power of the conventional wisdom that the stimulus was a ludicrous failure and totally uncool to talk about it without ruling rise and making ironic comments. you totally stimulated the economy when you gave that panhandler at a dollar. even obama joked after his annual thanksgiving pardon that he saved or created four turkeys. my friends here know that i have a contrarian streak. i don't do groupthink. the guy who visited gulf after the bp spill and rode the environmental damage was being overstated, i was right. i had data. arguing that the stimulus was a new new deal was not just considered contrarian but delusional. like arguing the bp spill didn't happen. we can discuss why. a combination of relentless republican distortion, incompetent white house communication, brain dead media coverage, the unfortunate timing of the jobs bill t
make it seem as though that when you talk about limits on the national government, that's antithetical to the constitution, the existence of a national government. it's embeddedded in the original argument. it argument was about limits. it wasn't about -- you hear this kind of and all these people trying to push us back to the article. that's ludicrous. and that's -- but helped to develop the constitution. .. the same time you understand there are some people still fighting the debate that engage in that debate and subsequent to that even in the adoption of 13th and 14th and 15th amendments you still have so we are still talking about what are the amendments of the national guard? what is the role of the national government, how we protect individual rights and liberties etc.. >> what's move forward and start talking about the events that press the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. i want our audience, everybody on c-span it isn't just -- it is a special anniversary, it isn't just a to enter the 25th anniversary of the year that changes everything in human history, we the people. it's al
and federal government. i will just briefly talk about my background and how i first got into the position as mayor. holyoke is a small city of about 40,000 people outside of springfield in the western part of massachusetts. i was born and raised there and went to the city's public schools became the first to my family to go on to college and when i got to brown studied urban studies there and like a lot of folks my age i chose to come back to my hometown and give back to the city that i thought had given me the opportunities that i had. holyoke has a very rich -- and also the first city to make paper so we are nicknamed the paper city. like a lot of cities in the northeast we were once a moving industrial city but at the same time folks came into holyoke and a lot of the factories close down, move south are moved overseas so we know have an 11% unemployment rate which is higher than the state national average and about 50% of our population is latino, puerto rican and a diversity as well. so i got elected last november. there were four of us running in the election. it was a nonpartisan r
with president obama's health plan, that it wasn't strong enough or that it's government takeover of health care, you can disdegree with him on taxes or whatever, but this is against him personally and trying to destroy and discredit him personally. the obama hate machine. and it's not just fox news. it's out there because of a couple of people that most americans have never heard of, the famous koch brothers, charles -- now-famous, charles and david coke. david koch. and, again, we've seen corporate-sponsored attacks against presidents before, particularly, and i outline two of them, franklin delano roosevelt. by the way, with him it was the dupont brothers, and there were free of those at the -- three of those at the time. formed the liberty league to deny fdr a second term. and then with bill clinton, of course; was richard melon safe who funded all the investigations that led to paula jones and on and on, and the articles in the american spectator. but nothing compared to the money and the organization that we've seen on the part of charles and david koch who are the heads of koch industries
who are not in the government, it's incumbent on us to continue to encourage cooperation inside and outside. all of us have thoughts and suggestions to offer and some have technological expertise to land or policy expertise as well but it doesn't have to be done internally and it's terrifying when the government says we are here to help you. we are from the transparency community. we are here to help house well. with that i would like to thank all of the panelists. i would like to thank representative fisa and -- issa and quigly. please visit transparentycaucess for the next event and thank you all so much. [applause] i want to raise an issue that has been for two or three weeks specifically on the national security terms. you already are the oldest president in history and some of your staff say you were tired after your most recent encounter with mr. mondale. i recall president kennedy had to go days on end with bear minimum sleep during the cuban missile crisis. is there any doubt in your mind you would be able to function in such circumstances? >> not at all. i want you to k
this can happen if the make of government on november 7 is the same as it is today? >> no. i think will happen for another reason. i think first of all when people figure out there's a big chunk of change, and second of all when you have the debate between the people trying to protect entitlement, and the people trying to kill energy, who are you betting on? >> in california they're saying just allow the winter fuel blend is not early is going to save, make as much as 50 cents a gallon, they've been paying over $5 a gallon in california, and california has created -- [inaudible] >> california is america if we don't change. that's a scary thought. you can see the future, just look to california. it should scare everybody in america. no one would want to go the. part of the answer of california is to stop trying to be the federal government. they can save a lot of money if they pull back from the own agencies and own regulations. but i do think we have this opportunity, to tom's point on this leg of the school got it all fits on a growth like if you will. because i think that we woul
. withstand back in place, struck down by the states in 1997 but the federal government, mandated by federal law, we already had two early decisions from district courts involving private plaintiffs or for profit plaintiffs and the issue to address the merits, there were procedural issues because of ongoing regulatory process that might create a sort of interim step in terms of going up and down the court but that actually is going to get resolved between now and august 1st, 2013. the administrative process will be done and the courts will invariably go straight and you will get merit decisions uniformly by the end of next year. >> those that depend on what the administration does and who wins? >> not really. what the administration has put into play is a piece of the problem. and also the constraints they put upon themselves in addressing that limited issue indicates that there is not going to be much if any relief in the offing for people who sued. basically reading of the writing on the wall or the federal register. there is some accommodation that doesn't include relieving the burden and
spending but he also believed the government had a positive role to play. the interstate highway system, which eisenhower -- which was eisenhower's brainchild. [applause] more money was spent on the intraday -- interstate highway system than the new deal from 1839 to 18 to 41 with zero impact on the budget because it was paid for through gasoline taxes. [applause] thethe st. lawrence seaway connecting the great lakes, opening the great lakes to traffic again had been on the drawing board since the administration of theodore roosevelt and eisenhower -- eisenhower took, assumed the presidency in a time of mccarthyism and incredible communist witchhunt. he did it as he did so many things in the background. it was eisenhower orchestrated the army's response in the army mccarthy hearings. i'm not going to get into a contest but that stunk. and when it was over mccarthy had him vanquished but i think it was the desegregation issue perhaps in which eisenhower most often underestimated. president truman had ordered the army to be desegregated in 1950 but the that the army had not complied. 85%
in the paper that the turkish government has agreed to give a billion dollars to the egyptian government. i thought it was an interesting twist in things. i think it's clear the egyptian feel maybe the american money isn't going come. maybe there isn't the money. that's going change the influence. in that part of the world engagement is the proof or the disprove of the the sis that is involved here. you scrolled a situation next year or the year after at some point where ron iran says we have a nuclear weapon. the united states hasn't gone in or taken military action to stop it. do you think it u would be fundamentally damage together united states perception of power and leadership in the world not being able to write checks is damaging the perception in the world we understand played. >> that was too hypothetical for me. seriously, there's so many steps in there. >> it's just one. >> the united states doesn't top iran from getting a nuclear weapon, does that san diego message that we are incapable of controlling outcomes in a way that some people think we might have in the past through mi
command of international affairs and his insight in the workings of government and other actors. with these gentlemen we are poised for an illuminating conversation about the world, the future and the revenge of geography. bobbit and david, over to you. >> i think you're probably not supposed to see the serious moderator by but i love this book. it's ridiculous how many yell will post its i've put in it. i'm not just doing it to flatter the teacher because i really like it and i want to try to walk the audience through this or have him what the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment. you said my reporting of for three decades convinced me we need to recover the sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age's when they dash across the continent which allow us to talk a lot of the distinguished columnist tom friedman labeled a flat world. instead level introduced readers to the decidedly unfashionable figures to push up against the notion that geography no longer matters. i want to ask you to start with the basics of
and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they're going to have to go back and authorized congress for more trillions of dollars of borrowing. the republicans and lots of people in congress don't want to authorize that. so there is going to be a bloody negotiation, unless they can work a deal. in a sense, this is a book about the past, but it's about the present. it is about where we are going and what the country's future is. if you think about it i would argue that the inability of the government to fix this borrowing debt deficit issue in the book, vice president b
. and the things you cite with regard to your work with the governor and the state government, those are things you should do. that is part of the job description to be in the united states senator. those are special. as part of the in basket. what we are talking about here is the ability to communicate with the governor, whoever he is, with the rest of the congressional delegation come with other members of congress from around the country to produce positive outcomes. and when i talk to people, what i hear is that there is no real evidence that they and this panel knows me. people around the state know me and they know i have a very different style and that's what we need in washington right now. these guys don't get things done. now i am proud of governor christie. i think he's doing a really good job. we see things often, if not most of the time the same way, but we are very different people. we have different styles, with both of the best interests of the state at heart. >> this'll be a surprise that i'm going to go to transportation. the future of amtrak has still been a political football be
. we had a government shut down. newt gingrich i clinton. once the government shut down, the pressure on both sides was so intense there was a deal in less than three weeks. the pressure, if we go into january, will be far greater than it was then because the economic consequences and the market consequences are more significant. i think it's inconceivable that if we go into january, there won't be a settlement in january, early february at the latest. we hit the debt ceiling in february anyway. there has to be a settlement. somebody has to blink, probably both sides blink to some degree. i've talked a little bit to people in financial markets in new york about how they think the markets would react to all of this. the reaction i've got is there's a lot of nervousness, a lot of volatility in the markets in january. if there is a deal in a few weeks, and any deal clearly makes retroactive to january 1st, the tax cuts continued, and we'll remove sequesteration, then what i'm told is in the interim the damage really won't be that significant. now, for fiscal hawks, many of us have been s
'll ever need in israel. and yes, we'll export the gas and today we decided the government at the beginning we'll export 50% of the gas i will evaluate this decision after we continue to drill in the water. but we are very lucky. and i think the energy market. also one being in my book is i haven't seen any of this year and 10 u.s., but now doing a pilot on the infrastructure and we try to use their brain for their solutions for energy. >> i am an israeli. i was born there. others raise their. as an israeli now, either argumentative, but this is not the forum for arguments. i am also a guest here. i enlaces gaston we're not supposed to attack, although you tempt me greatly. >> we can do that in israel. >> after my house we can do that. not everybody in israel is in agreement with you. there's many experienced people, smart people, don't hold on to your point of view. i have a very simple question. israel is a mighty country. it is the strongest country in the middle east. israel has a clichÉ of atomic weapons. for many years, they obtained like we used to do historically to obtain arms and
been starved by an intelligencal government policy over the last ten to fifteen years. it's a place that houses and has housed for well over a decade of serious of -- concentration camps where political prisoners are tortured, sometimes executed for crimes no more serious than listening to a foreign radio broadcast. , reading a bible or disrespecting a picture of the dear leader. it's really a chilling book and it's a book that should be must read for anyone who cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment and the foreign policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. the provocations by the regime, missile launches, underground nuclear test or the occasional thinking of south korean boat. they are followed by threats of sanction by the international community. a lot of hand wringing. as with the child, the province of better behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime. in many respects continuing to prop up the regime. and
of in campaign mode and governing mode. how do they react to moment like this? they obviously don't panic but they do what? how do they take a bad thing and neutralize it and ultimately a good thing. how? >> the president has an expression. talks about our time in the barrel. and he's been the underdog enough times. he has gone through enough times. that, they're smart and they know our time in the barrel is going to come and this now is their time. they're in the barrel and they're going to spend a couple of days trying to convince people that he has game. and, two weeks from now, the debate at hofstra, in new york, he will get to show but, i thought that was a very smart point you made about the sort of soft interviews. i bet we'll see him out doing some tougher ones. mixing it up a little bit showing he has got game. >> couple minutes left. glen tlush is writing analysis, one of many analysis. >> shake the russ off analysis. >> with a hot looking hat. tell me what your analysis says? has it been posted yet? people get a sneak-peek via you? >> i got to tell you man, i just heard the las
. the protection against government sponsorship and promotion of religion, which is a vital component of religious liberty. i will just say a few words about where we are today and where we used to be. they are important right next to each other. as for the separation of church and state, the protection against government sponsorship of religion there was little and today it is far more robust, but absent flows and a lot of that depends on the current competition and chemistry of the supreme court and the rest of the federal court in state courts as well. but a while back there was virtually none. i think there is a great deal more of that protection today. it is very much in jeopardy. on the free exercise side, it is never been particularly robust in this country, unfortunately. and i think it is very fortunate. today it is a mixed bag. in 1990, the supreme court severely limited the constitutional protection for free exercise in the way that i think probably all of us at this table think was wrong. and since then, there have been legislative efforts to correct the problem. what the court said ba
of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land, where should the human landing be. >> so what's the time limit? >> what's that? >> what's the timeline? >> write
networks for the poor in new mexico. i believe if the federal government would have block granted the state of new mexico 43% less money, done away with all the strings and the mandates that i could have effectively overseen the delivery of health care to the poor. i think you apply that same template to medicare, health care for those over 65, get the federal government out of the health care business completely, give it up to the states -- in this case block grants that balance revenu with expenditures -- and that's how we're going to get out of this. we're going to -- giving it up to the states, 50 laboratories of innovation and best practice, i think that's exactly what we will have. we'll have some fabulous success, we'll also have some horrible failure. failure will get avoided, success will get emulated. but that's how we're going to find our way out of this. >> host: gary johnson is joining us from new mexico this morning. he will be with us for about 40 more minutes. we'll put the phone numbers on the bottom of the screen as we take a look at the libertarian nominee and his positio
have no problem with requiring an i.d. as long as number one, you know, the government makes a proactive effort to go to people who are qualified to vote, register to vote but you know, don't have i.d.s and you know i wonder for example some states, why does an expired, and i will say this for tsa too, why does an expired driver's license not work? i mean, did your identity change because your driver's license -- license -- -- viewer 93 years old and your driver's license expired four years ago. what is the problem they're? and also that it's kosher. in other words, if a concealed carry permit in texas is allowed, then why isn't a university of texas student i.d. also issued by the state of texas not count? it is kosher and above and beyond that you know i don't think it's particularly onerous. most people in society do have to register. in nursing homes and institutionalized settings or other places. most people do have i.d.s and i think the government could do something to reach into other places and help people get i.d.s but that should be part of the deal. let's go back t
they came from government research grants. we have the department of defense which always wanted us to be at the very cutting edge of technology. we had the internet was originally a way for government scientist to communicate with each other. clearly that basis is sort of the big reason silicon valley got started and we sort of had this critical mass and created the fertile ground and on the job training and kind of the kind of interaction that helped us. >> guest: i would say it's possible. i'm skeptical of it. and skeptical of it for two reasons. when you think about the internet, think about all the commercialization of it that has occurred since 1992 or three when they came up with the browsers. almost all that has been done by private enterprise to very little of it i think was done by the government. and so the second is i don't know about you but when i think back to what i learned in school, all learning occurs on the job. it's highly specialized. and that you really learn by doing over the course of your career very little of which are taking away from school. that's the t
and these are all government documents and they have never been found. so that was one thing he seems to have gotten away with. another thing was in 2004, smart tag played a central role in the presidential election. the secretary of each state, a part of their job is to oversee an impartial election. you may recall kathleen harris in florida was secretary of state of florida and she also haven't played a central role in the bush election and there is considerable controversy over that. well, a very similar thing happened in ohio in 2004, where ken blackwell was secretary of state. and again, he was supposed to oversee a fair and impartial election. but he happened to be cochaired the bush cheney reelection committee. he decided to tabulate the return for the 2004 election was secretary of state's computers weren't enough than they needed to get another set of computer service. so who did he go to both smart tack. smart tax roll raises an amount of very interesting questions. i went through the returns as deeply studied. there were several lawsuits. you can see when the returns came in that night. a
component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 seconds to respond. christie: you know, we have not been able to get much done. my energy policy is making sure that we just create energy positions, short term, long term, medium-term growth for energy, but i just want to make sure that everybody knows that i will be a consistent champion for wind and renewable fuels in this district and congressman king has not been. [applause] moderator: your response, congressman? steve: i happen to be the american wind energy champion designated by the american wind energy association. [applause] i am supported by the renewable fuel and it -- industry across the board so far as i know. we are the number one renewable energy producing congressional district and all of america, the western third of iowa. when you add the other counties to make this we will easily be the number one renewable energy producing district, and i have been part of that. i am proud of what has been accom
called it the committee effect is really not committees, it was governments. he'll dealing with the canadian government we're asking them for the pass passport. can you imagine them coming us and asking us for blank bass pass -- passport. no. he's dealing with every level of the white house and jimmy carter who approved -- tony had one foot out of the door in germany and a cable came in that said stop. the president is reviewing the findings. twenty in in the -- twenty minutes later, god speed. good luck. from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. he said, if this didn't go well, the american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadian and the white house, he's working with the cia, bureaucracy and the state department. it's difficult get everybody on the same page with the idea they're calling the best bad they could come up with. he did all of that. but beyond that, he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarter often tells us don't do that. don't go in t
electronically it was as good as if it had been printed by the government printing office, stuck on a truck, delivered over here and then distributed to individual offices. there were other things we did, mandatory webcasting kind would push committee to do that, maximum extent practical. we also as part of the effort to make electronic text available, you know, serve as a place where they could measure our own efforts to comply with 3-d rule. we created docks at house.gov in the coming weeks. so far for all of this year that has been on line for stuff coming to the floor. through a lot of good work from our colleagues in the clerk's office. i would expect that would come online for committees early next year. that work is ongoing. looking at the next congress, i don't see the need for a whole lot of rule changes on this front. obviously, we are willing to entertain suggestions but i think we are still in the process of frankly implementing the rules changes we made last time around and 30 evaluating their impact on what we are doing your in terms of our day-to-day legislative business. and
and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the right. so i felt that it is time that we had a category to describe these people come as a pure progressives is what i came up with. >> host: post central authority, post decentralized authority? >> guest: yes, the best example is the way the internet was built and the way that the web was built. the internet was partially a result of visionary government unnamed, which we've heard a lot about in the early days there is some important funding for the government. for the most part from the internet was built by louis collaborative networks come with that in leaders, without any bureaucrat that people who aren't actually trying to patent their inventions, want working for private corporation a more freely building on each other's ideas that were fighting those ideas sharing them. now, this is one of things where if we had this conversati
into january. what happens if we do? think of 1995. we have a government shut down. once the government shutdown, the pressure on both sides was so intense there was a deal in less than three weeks. the pressure when we go into january will be greater than it was then because the economic consequences if the market consequences are more significant. i think it is inconceivable that if we go into january there won't be a settlement in january, early february of the latest. we hit the debt ceiling in february anyway. there has to be a settlement. somebody will have to wait. probably both sides will link to some degree. i've talked a little that to people in financial markets in new york about how they think the markets would react to all this. there would be a lot of nervousness and a lot of volatility in the markets in january. if there is a deal with a few weeks on any deal, clearly retroactive to january 1st the tax cuts that have continued and will remove sequestration. then what i am being told is in the interim the dynamics won't be that significant. now, for the fiscal hawks, many
not committees of government. he's dealing with the canadian government. we are asking them for carte blanche for the passport. can you imagine the canadian government coming to the united states congress and asking us for blank passports? domeback. he's dealing with every level from the white house, jimmy carter, who actually approved, tony had one foot out the door in germany and a cable came into his head stop, president is reviewing. 20 minutes later, godspeed, good luck, from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. because as he said, if this didn't a wealthy american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadians, working wit with a we us, working with the cia bureaucracy, and is working with the state department. and it's difficult to get everybody on the same page with the idea that they are calling the best bad idea they could come up with. he did all that. but beyond that he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarters often tells us don't do that. don't go in the airpo
to as we think about setting up the rules for the auction. >> host: what about looking at government-held spectrum as well? >> guest: that's another piece of the puzzle that i talked about repeatedly since i got to the fcc. it's a critical part to the extent that the federal goth by some -- federal government by some estimate krolls approximately 40% of the magnetic spectrum, and i think we need to think creatively about ways to facilitate the clearing and reallocation of spectrum in cases where it's not being used as efficiently. and to the extent that's not possible, i'm not opposed to innovative sharing strategies. >> host: do you think there's a better solution? do you -- is there a better solution than the spectrum auction to get spectrum out in the marketplace? >> guest: well, as i outlined in pittsburgh, i take an all of the above approach, so while the television broadcast spectrum is one critical part of the puzzle that, you know, could work to the benefit of consumers, it's not the only one. there are other bands that i've talked about where the commission could take action
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)